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Showing posts with label Windows. Show all posts
Showing posts with label Windows. Show all posts

Rainmeter : Desktop customization program for Windows

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Rainmeter is the best known and most popular desktop customization program for Windows. Enhance your Windows computer at home or work with skins; handy, compact applets that float freely on your desktop. Rainmeter skins provide you with useful information at a glance. It's easy to keep an eye on your system resources, like memory and battery power, or your online data streams, including email, RSS feeds, and weather forecasts.
Many skins are even functional: they can record your notes and to-do lists, launch your favorite applications, control your media player - all in a clean, unobtrusive interface that you can rearrange and customize to your liking.

There are thousands and thousands of skins available, crafted by a large and ever-growing community of Rainmeter users.
Rainmeter is not just an application, it is a robust toolkit. Create and modify your own skins in a simple language that's easy to learn, with the help of our extensive documentation, getting started guide and skin tutorials. Skins call upon measures, a set of powerful built-in modules that do all the heavy lifting, and create interactive meters to display that information however you decide. In this way, Rainmeter brings productive innovation together with creative artistry like no other platform of its kind.

Rainmeter is a community. People in our forums are always happy to help you get started or answer questions. Over the last few years, a thriving community has built up around Rainmeter, as average users freely contribute their own original skins, their generous knowledge and support, and their inspirational ideas to a project whose scope and capabilities are constantly expanding.
Rainmeter is designed for YOUR system. Rainmeter uses very little CPU and RAM resources, has a tiny space footprint, and will run perfectly well on any hardware using Windows XP through Windows 8.
Rainmeter is free and open source. Rainmeter is open source software distributed free of charge under the terms of the GNU GPL v2 license. If you want to get involved, check the Rainmeter GitHub repository.
You can download it from their official website:- Rainmeter
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Install Windows in 10 Minutes!!!!

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http://techwarlock.blogspot.in/2012/03/how-to-install-windows-xp-in-10-minutes.html

Formatting And Fresh Installation of Windows  is a lengthy and boring Process But we all Have To do that.Sometimes In a Month And Sometimes in A week.Its Approx 40-60 minutes long process.But Friends Today I will Show You how To format Or Fresh Install  in Just 10 minutes.So Lets Take A look.

To perform a clean installation of Windows XP, follow these steps: 



  • Start your computer from the Windows XP CD. To do this, insert the Windows XP CD into your CD drive or DVD drive, and then restart your computer.  

  • Note To boot from your Windows XP CD, the BIOS settings on your computer must be configured to do this.

    1. When you see the "Press any key to boot from CD" message, press any key to start the computer from the Windows XP CD.
    1. At the Welcome to Setup screen, press ENTER to start Windows XP Setup.
    1. Read the Microsoft Software License Terms, and then press F8.
    1. Follow the instructions on the screen to select and format a partition where you want to install Windows XP.
    1. Follow the instructions on the screen to complete the Windows XP Setup.

    STEP 1 : After the Copy Part is Over ... System is Rebooted as we all know In general Formatting Procedure...
    Now After Reboot The Below Image Will Appear....
      
    So Friends Above All Is Only Normal Process. The main Part Begins From Here...

    http://techwarlock.blogspot.in/2012/03/how-to-install-windows-xp-in-10-minutes.html

    STEP 2: Now As This Image APPEARS You Have to Press  "Shift + F10 "  . This Will Open The command Prompt...  Now type  taskmgr  in it. This will open the Task manager .

    STEP 3 : After The task Manager Opens Goto Processes ... And Find "Setup.exe"  process and Right CLICK on It.... and set the Priority to Highest....

    http://techwarlock.blogspot.in/2012/03/how-to-install-windows-xp-in-10-minutes.html

    STEP 4
    : Now Just Wait And Watch It Will Completed In 2 minutes To 9 Minutes. Vary From System To System.
                                                   Done....
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    Converting Videos With VLC

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    There’s no doubt that VLC is one of the most acclaimed and feature-rich media players available. Yes, of course the reason is its seamless ability to play wide variety of media files and discs but that’s not all.
    Using VLC you can do many creative things with your videos and one of the examples that we have already seen is its ability to cut video clips. I’m sure you’ll appreciate the ease with which it gets the job done without any hassle whatsoever.
    Impressive, right? So, today we will see how you can use your VLC media player as a free video converter for all your media files.

    Converting Videos With VLC


    Step 1: Launch VLC media player and click on Media –> Convert / Save.
    convert save


    Step 2: Under the file tab you will see two sections. In the first one add the file you want to convert while the second section can be used to embed a subtitle to the converted video that’s already in sync.

             open file

    Step 3: Click on the Convert/Save button when you are done. Finally select the destination folder, give a desired filename, select the desired video profile and click on the start button.

                destination file

    Note: By default VLC media player comes packed with a few profiles that can convert your video to most of the widely used audio and video formats. You can edit, delete or create new profiles using three buttons located next to the select profile dropdown list.

       advance editing

    You can play with various settings like audio and video codecs to get your desired conversion profile.

    Step 5: Once everything is at place press the start button.
    It’s now time to sit back and relax. The player will stream the video in twice the speed and convert it at the same time in the background.

    My Opinion

    VLC video converter is as powerful as any of the widely used video converters. With editable parameters like codecs to use, frame rate, bitrate etc, VLC can surely give most of the paid converters out there a run for their money. The only feature lacking is the ability to batch convert videos.
    So do try using VLC as a video converter and share with us your experience.
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    Top 10 Registry Tweaks that Power Up Windows

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    Top 10 Registry Tweaks that Power Up Windows

    The Windows registry is a mysterious place, but if you're comfortable editing it, you have the power to tweak nearly every Windows setting you can imagine. Here are 10 of our favorite registry tweaks that make life easier.
    All of these hacks work in Windows 7, even if not labeled as such. Many may work in Vista or earlier versions of Windows, but varies, so be sure to read up more on the tweak before you go meddling in Vista's registry. And, of course, be sure to make a backup of your registry before you start hacking away.


    10. Hide Pre-Populated Items in Windows Explorer's Sidebar

     

    Windows Explorer is pretty easy to navigate, but that sidebar can easily get cluttered with features you don't use. For example, if you're the only computer on your network, you probably have no need for the Homegroup or Network trees. Each item in the Explorer sidebar has a registry key, and with just a few minor tweaks, you can have them hidden in no time.

    9. Disable Libraries in Windows 7

    \Top 10 Registry Tweaks that Power Up Windows


    The new Libraries feature in Windows 7 is, in our opinion, one of its best underhyped features—but if you can't get over the annoyance of having multiple folders grouped together, you can get rid of them with a simple registry tweak. Note that, while you can hide them from the Explorer sidebar using #10, the feature itself is still around, and will likely pop up in other applications. So if you really don't like Libraries, this tweak will get them out of your sight for good

    8. Change Your User Profile Location


    Top 10 Registry Tweaks that Power Up Windows
    Whether you've bought an SSD and need to move your home folder to another drive or you just don't like how long it takes to navigate to your documents, the registry has a few options for moving your user profile folder. It's not something you want to do if you've been using your computer for awhile (since many places will reference the profile's old location), and it isn't for the faint of heart—since it involves a good 21 steps—but in the end, it may very well make your life a lot easier.

    7. Customize Windows Explorer's "Open With" Menu

    Top 10 Registry Tweaks that Power Up Windows

    The context menu is great for performing tasks quickly, but as you install more programs, that "Open With" menu can get incredibly unruly. To get rid of those "Open With" entries that never seem to serve any use, you can manually edit which programs show up for which file extensions in the registry. It's a bit more time consuming than other registry tweaks, but it's far from difficult, and you're sure to be happy with the end result. If, on the other side of the coin, you want a program permanently docked in the "Open With" menu, you can add it yourself through the registry too.

    6. Speed Up the Windows 7 Taskbar

    Top 10 Registry Tweaks that Power Up Windows

    The Taskbar is no doubt one of the best features in Windows 7, but it isn't without its tiny annoyances. The Taskbar popups (along with the associated Aero Peek functionality) require you to hover your mouse over the taskbar for a second before they appear—a delay that gets old quickly. If you'd like to speed up the thumbnail delay, all you need to do is tweak a simple key in the registry. You can also get rid of the Aero Peek delay, for super-fast window management. If the Taskbar thumbnails and Aero Peek aren't your style, you can use this registry hack to cycle through windows quickly with mouse clicks instead.

    5. Disable Annoying Notification Balloons



    Top 10 Registry Tweaks that Power Up Windows


    The notification balloons in Windows' lower right-hand corner can be helpful, but if you have a number of things going on at once, they can get pretty annoying. It's an extreme measure, but if you'd like to turn them off altogether, all it takes is a very simple registry tweak. Of course, if you find that disabling them completely is too extreme, you can always turn them back on.

    4. Change Your PC's Registered Owner


    Top 10 Registry Tweaks that Power Up Windows


    Whether you've acquired a used PC from someone else, or you just don't like the name you registered anymore, you can change the registered owner and registered organization of your PC with a quick registry tweak. It may seem useless to some, but when you inherit an office computer or end up changing where you work, it's a pain when your computer automatically adds incorrect information to everything.

    3. Take Ownership of Any File from the Context Menu

    Top 10 Registry Tweaks that Power Up Windows

    If you don't have ownership permissions of a file or folder in Windows, it can be difficult to work with it—and taking ownership of a file is no easy task. Thankfully, with a small registry hack, you can add a "Take Ownership" option to the Windows Explorer context menu, making you the owner of the file in just two clicks. We briefly mentioned this tip before, but you can find the full hack over at our friend The How-To Geek.

    2. Stop Windows Update from Hijacking Your PC

    Top 10 Registry Tweaks that Power Up Windows

    Windows' automatic update system is convenient for those of us that would rather not deal with manual updates day in and day out, but when it forces you to reboot your computer (or forces you to install updates when you put your computer to sleep), it can make you want to pull your hair out. Thanks to the registry, however, there are a few different tweaks that will keep Windows Update from getting up in your business: one to keep it from forcibly rebooting your computer, and one to keep it away from your shut down and sleep buttons.

    1. Enable God Mode to Quickly Access Any Setting You Want

    Top 10 Registry Tweaks that Power Up Windows

    If there's one thing that bugs me about Windows 7, it's that the new Control Panel takes forever to navigate, with seemingly infinite levels of buttons and links to click through just to activate one setting. The Windows 7 "God Mode" hack (which is one of our five favorite Windows 7 tweaks) puts every setting in the Control Panel at your fingertips through a magical folder in Windows Explorer. You don't actually need to enter the Registry Editor to create this beast, but it certainly qualifies as a registry hack, as you're essentially using the registry's Globally Unique Identifiers to create a desktop shortcut to all those settings. While the God Mode folder is the most popular use for this method, it's also worth noting that you can use it to create (or re-create) other system places like the Recycle Bin, My Computer, Libraries, and others.




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    How to Activate 'God Mode' on Windows 7 and 8

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    Maybe you have heard about ‘God Mode’, something that allows you to access all sorts of settings you normally can’t see or find in Windows 7 or 8? It's literally your control panel on steroids. There are programs to do this for you (we will get to this in a minute) but it also very easy to activate yourself in less than a minute. Here’s how:

    Step 1: Right click on your desktop and select New, Folder. See screenshot below showing how it will appear:




    Optionally, if you don't want a desktop icon you can create a new folder in your C: drive by using either Windows Explorer or My Computer and simply right click on C: and select New, Folder. You can then access it there anytime.

    Step 2: Copy and paste this for the new folder name:

    GodMode.{ED7BA470-8E54-465E-825C-99712043E01C}

    See screenshot below:




    Step 3:

    The folder will now be a shortcut to 'God Mode' on your desktop. See screenshot below.





    When you click it, you will find tons of hidden settings you can modify. See screenshot below:




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    How to Prevent Your Computer from Overheating (and Why It's Important)

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    How to Prevent Your Computer from Overheating (and Why It's Important)

    Keeping your computer running within safe temperatures is important, especially as the temperature rises outside. Here's how to make sure your computer's not overheating—and how to fix it if it is.
    The cooling system of your computer is one of the most important features of the device. Without the cooling system, the electrical components of your computer wouldn't be able to function; overheating would damage the integral parts of what makes your computer work. The heat has to be dissipated in order to keep everything working within safe operating temperatures


    Why an Overheated Computer Is Dangerous

    Simply put, if your computer becomes too hot, it is possible to destroy and shorten the lifespan of the hardware inside your computer, leading to irreparable damage and potential data loss. Besides losing your data, heat pecks away at your computer's internal organs—the motherboard, CPU, and more—significantly shortening its lifespan.
    Besides the most obvious reason to keep your computer cool, a hot computer will also run slower than a cooler computer. So to prevent your computer from slowing down, make sure that it is running at a moderate or low temperature.

    What Temperature Should My Computer Be Running At?

    Because of the different types of computer makes and models out there, the safe temperature range your computer should run at varies. The safe operating range depends on things like processor type, manufacturer, and other factors that make it impossible to give an answer that applies to all CPUs.
    According to the folks at the Overclockers Club (a site dedicated to pushing CPU performance to its limits without overheating your CPU):
    AMD and Intel both have maximum temperature ratings for their CPUs listed around 80C. If your CPU gets this hot, you've got some serious problems. Most people try and keep the CPU temperature below 40C at idle and below 55C at load.

    How to Check the Temperature of Your PC

    Sticking your hand over your computer's ventilation system or case isn't an accurate way to judge how hot your computer is running. (However, it can be a good gauge of whether your computer is getting progressively hotter, or climbing to astronomical temperatures. It should not be so hot that you would want to pull back your hand.) So how do you determine how hot your system's running? You've got a few options.
    To check the computer's temperature without additional software, you can check your system BIOS. Restart your computer, and on the boot screen, you should have an option to press a key (often Delete) to enter the BIOS. Once you enter Setup, navigate the BIOS menu using the on-screen instructions. You should be able to find a menu that deals with the computer's hardware monitors and CPU. There should be a field that lists your CPU temperature.
    How to Prevent Your Computer from Overheating (and Why It's Important)
    Rather not restart your computer to check the temp? We don't blame you. Plenty of system monitoring tools can give you a temperature read-out, like free Windows program HWMonitor, which displays the temperature of the CPU, each of the computer's cores, video card, hard drives, along with the minimum and maximum values of each temperature. (Unfortunately, you'll need to make sure that your hardware is supported because the program can only read certain sensors.)
    We've featured several system monitoring options in the past that can also handle these duties, like the cross-platform, previously mentioned GKrellM (Windows/Mac/Linux), system-tray friendly app Real Temp, Core Temp, and SpeedFan. SpeedFan has the added bonus of being able to show how fast each fan is spinning, complete with RPM readings.

    How to Keep Your Computer From Overheating

    Most computers come with adequate cooling systems and plenty of fans, but here are some steps you can take to ensure heat doesn't become a problem.
    Keep it clean: The first step in overheating prevention is making sure that the insides of the computer are kept clean. We've covered how to give your computer a spring cleaning to get rid of the dust that's a huge culprit in raising your computer's temperature.
    How to Prevent Your Computer from Overheating (and Why It's Important)

    Dust is an insulator. When you crack open the case of your computer and [it's blanketed with dust] you're looking at a computer that's facing a radically reduced life span. Every inch of it is covered with a blanket of insulating dust that raises the temperature of components across the board. Your computer might not be that dusty but given how easy it is to clean out a computer, it's ridiculous not to. Not taking the time to dust out your computer once or twice a year is like being too busy to get your oil changed.

    Avoid hot neighbors: It's also important to check the physical location of your computer. If you have devices nearby that are blowing hot air into the computer's intakes, that's not good either. Ideally, the flow of air where the fans are should be steady and adequate, with room for the computer to breathe.

    If Your Computer Overheats Anyway

    Here's a word of caution: If your computer is overheating, resist the urge to take the side of the case off the computer. It's a rookie mistake that will often make the problem worse. Because most computers are very carefully designed to ensure that cool air is delivered to critical components, removing the side of the case disrupts the circulation (convection) system.
    Instead, shut down the computer and let it cool down. From then on, you can plan a course of action that involves doing some cleaning if necessary, potentially upgrading your BIOS (check your motherboard's manual or web site for details), or planning some system-cooling upgrades if necessary.
    If your computer is clean, your BIOS is up to date, and you're still having temperature problems, crack open your computer and check for damaged fans and heat sinks. Check for cracks, missing pieces, and make sure all the push pins are secure and all the appropriate fans are running. Secure and/or replace any loose or damaged cables. If you find you've got broken fans or a damaged heatsink, you can buy and install new cooling hardware for relatively cheap, and finding a highly rated, compatible fan or heatsink on a site like Newegg can potentially go a long ways toward keeping your computer cooler.
    If you're not comfortable cracking open your PC and installing new parts, this is the point that you may want to consider finding some professional help.

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